Connect 5 Friday and NF Nov. – Teaching Books

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This week I am joining both Nonfiction November and Connect Five Friday with 5 teaching/education books that informed and ultimately improved my teaching.

It’s Friday once again and that means it’s time for Connect Five Friday,  hosted at Book Date by Kathryn – the meme where we share five book/reading things that connect in some way.

Nonfiction November is an opportunity to share and celebrate nonfiction works. For Week 3, hosted by Rennie @ What’s Nonfiction, I am choosing to Play The Expert.

5 Books About Teaching

I taught for over 30 years, mostly from Kindergarten to grade 3. I always wanted to be a teacher and now that I am retired, I still miss it. I own all these books, read them and referred to them repeatedly.  

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The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Inner Reader in Every Child by Donalyn Miller. This book had the greatest impact on my teaching of reading. Although I did many of the activities Miller detailed in her book, there were many that I needed to enhance and practice. As the Library Journal described her work: “Her approach is simple yet provocative: affirm the reader in every student, allow students to choose their own books, carve out extra reading time, model authentic reading behaviors, discard timeworn reading assignments…, and develop a classroom filled with high-interest books.”

I saw the improvement in my Grade 3 students and the increase in their enjoyment of reading.

 

Daily 5 2nd Ed

The Daily Five by Gail Boushey and Joan Moser. This is a well-rounded literacy programme that I used extensively. “The Daily 5 is a structure for learning. It has 5 components that can be taught daily: 1) read to self, 2) read to someone, 3) listen to reading, 4) word work, and 5) writing.”

 

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Teach Like Your Hair is on Fire: The Methods and Madness Inside Room 56 by Rafe Esquith. I so loved the passion for teaching that Esquith has. It helped rekindle my passion as well.

 

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Reading Essentials by Regie Routman. Another excellent resource – “The Specifics you need to teach reading well.” She also wrote Conversations, full of wonderful insights into teaching, learning and evaluating.

 

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Guiding Readers and Writers by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. This was the first book I used of this group of 5 and it remained a necessary piece of my literacy classroom until I retired.

 

There are so many wonderful books that support teaching, especially in teaching reading and writing. These are just the tip of the iceberg.

 

11 thoughts on “Connect 5 Friday and NF Nov. – Teaching Books

  1. Be still my heart! Bev we were teaching twins! I loved Donalyn Miller’s Book Whisperer and I introduced the Daily Five to my class and school. It totally changed my teaching and they were the best years of teaching. I had the Fountas and Pinnell book as well. Oh you can see how influenced I am by the USA but when its worth it – it is worth it. I even connected my class via Skype with the author who wrote Because of Mr Terupt – Rob Buyea.

    • I’ve felt we were kindred spirits too. Miller’s book gave me the confidence to really change my reading practice with my students to what I believed. Every year I saw so much growth in the students from the beginning of the year to the end – and the greater no. of books read by students. Haven’t read Buyea’s book – will check it out

      • Buyea’s book was a middle grade, it just hit the spot with the class at the time. Same with me with Miller’s book and Daily Five just gave us the opportunity to do concentrated reading and writing.

  2. These all sound like great books! Anything that helps inspire and motivate children to read. Miller’s book especially interests me. I am not a teacher, but I am a parent. I will have to look for it. Thank you for sharing! I hope you have a great weekend.

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